Marion Lane

Cooler Heads, 2012
acrylic on panel
13" x 13"


Marion Lane

Sunset Alley Tamale, 2013
acrylic on panel
46" x 46"


Marion Lane

Wild West, 2013
acrylic on panel
46" x 46"


Marion Lane

Theoretical Dream Drone, 2013
acrylic on panel
46" x 46"


Marion Lane

Syria, 2013
acrylic on panel
46" x 46"


Marion Lane

Pond Lake, 2013
acrylic on panel
46" x 46"


Marion Lane

Spontaneous Utterance, 2013
acrylic on panel
46" x 46"


Marion Lane

Well Hello Kitty Cat!, 2013
acrylic on panel
46" x 46"


Marion Lane

And Cake, 2013
acrylic on panel
46" x 46"


Marion Lane

Friends, 2013
acrylic on panel
46" x 46"


Marion Lane

Malibu Wedding, 2013
acrylic on panel
46" x 46"


Marion Lane

LAUNCH LA is proud to present Adventures in Suntan Alley by Marion Lane. This latest exhibition is a delightfully curious interpretation of Los Angeles' unique visual brand. Though Lane's paintings look something like hybrids between amoeba DNA and corner-shop candies, they contain hints of all the vital ingredients of the city's make-up, from sun and sea to concrete and steel - rendered with such hypnotic appeal that it's hard to look away.

The title of the show refers, in part, to Lane's workspace: an outdoor painting studio with ten foot tall brick walls, big enough to accommodate the exhibition's forty-six inch square paintings. This title is also a nod to any encounter, however brief, with the elemental Los Angeles, a place where sun, color and topography enter the vocabulary of Southern California life. Lane's paintings strive to capture these penetrating moments, when the clash between man-made Los Angeles and the rugged wilderness beneath exposes a startling and revelatory beauty. Though the sun features prominently, these moments aren't typical post-card scenes. If anything, Lane is more interested in the accidentally artful - "when the traffic light is startlingly beautiful against the expansive California sky or the orange traffic cone coordinates wildly with shiny metallic machinery."

Despite this scenic focus, Lane's paintings are not identifiable as landscapes. She does not concern herself with capturing actual appearances, but rather strives for an impression of exceptional instances of atmosphere, light and texture. Her studio provides abundance: the invading waves of sunshine and light create what Lane calls "a conflation of extreme beauty and slight radioactivity." This quality of "radioactivity" is also evident in her paints, having been rendered either impossibly bright or faded, as if bleached by the sun's heat. This brightness mirrors the optimism and cartoon-like quality of her vision, providing a means of showcasing the best facets of life in metropolitan Los Angeles. Lane's characters are an endless variety of three-dimensional shapes on patterned backgrounds, resembling living organisms and vibrant ecosystems rather than static images. Their vertical stripes, pastel pinks and earthy browns, bubbling purples and icy-blues prove even more immersive than landscapes. They are everything beautiful condensed into an alchemical essence of color and light.

Marion Lane resides and works in Los Angeles.

For the last decade her work has been shown extensively across California, from Los Angeles to San Francisco and everywhere in between. Her art has been featured in publications like the Artweek, ArtScene and the LA Weekly.

Her exhibitions are an outlet for her immense curiosity about the human eye and its systems for organizing color and form. For her audience these explorations have been abundantly fruitful.


ARTIST STATEMENT

The pleasures of sight are elusive and unexpected. The pursuit of them drives us into the future.

In these paintings Japanese kitsch meets French rococo (with a nod to1970's Americana). Not as random or frivolous as it might sound, this particular deconstruction tentatively entitled "Living in the Pink and Green" is in service of an attempt to provide a place where, if the time is right, an eyeball will stop, go back, and proceed again. It is this freewheeling rogue eyeball that is so elusive and yet so enjoyable, which gives rise to the pleasures of sight.

My last paintings were abstracted television images, frame by frame. Television seems particularly apt, maybe even designed to move eyeballs. These paintings although still heavily influenced by television are actually landscapes or maps (topological landscapes).

Marie Antoinette mashed up with Hello Kitty in pursuit of the rogue eyeball.

- Marion Lane, 2012


Artist Bio

Video of the artist at work